Social Studies

    • Students will continue to explore history, geography, civics and economics through required courses and a variety of electives available to students. Students will develop the skills to develop their own research topics and communicate their findings to the larger community. Students will learn to become critical consumers of information and active members of their society.

  • World History (2301/2302)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9

    Students will explore the major events and movements in world history. Emphasis will be placed on the development of students’ skills to analyze history as they study world civilizations. A greater focus will be placed on interpretation and independent study including a stronger focus on writing skills.

  • World History (2401/2402)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9

    Students will explore the major events and movements in world history. Emphasis will be placed on the development of students’ skills to analyze history as they study world civilizations. The class will include in-depth and accelerated work, emphasizing the interpretation of trends and movements by analyzing and interpreting original and secondary documents and readings. Students will engage in extensive reading and historical writing, while adhering to the demanding structure of this course.

  • Global Economics (2304)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Students will explore global economic issues and individual economic decisions. A major component of the course will be an analysis of the international dimensions of economics. A greater focus will be placed on interpretation and independent study including a stronger focus on writing skills.

  • Global Economics (2404)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Students will explore global economic issues and individual economic decisions. A major component of the course will be an analysis of the international dimensions of economics. A greater focus will be placed on interpretation and independent study including a stronger focus on writing skills. Students will engage in extensive reading and analysis, while adhering to the demanding structure of this course.

  • American Government (2306)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    This course is designed to analyze the study of general topics and concepts involved in American government and politics. Students focus on the federal, state, and local government systems and interpret the United States and Illinois Constitutions. A greater focus will be placed on interpretation and independent study including a stronger focus on writing skills.

  • American Government (2406)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Students will develop an analytical perspective on the federal, state, and local governments and politics, including a study of concepts used to interpret government and politics, as well as the analysis of specific examples, i.e., the United States and Illinois Constitutions. Students will write extensively on governmentrelated work and will be adhere to the demanding structure of this course.

  • U.S. History (2308/2309)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11, 12

    This course is a study of U.S. history from colonization to the present, focusing on social, political, economic, and geographic developments of the United States. Students will analyze and interpret original documents and other non-fiction materials.

  • U.S. History (2408/2409)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11, 12

    This course is a study of U.S. history from colonization to the present, focusing on social, political, economic, and geographic developments of the United States. The class will include in-depth and accelerated work, emphasizing the interpretation of trends and movements by analyzing and interpreting original and secondary documents and readings. Students will engage in extensive reading and historical writing, while adhering to the demanding structure of this course.



  • AP Psychology (2515/2516)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    The purpose of the AP course in Psychology is to introduce the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included is a consideration of the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. Students also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Psychology exam to earn possible college credit.

  • AP Human Geography (2530/2531)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward a core graduation requirement.

    The primary goal of this social studies course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students will employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They will learn about methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. The advantages of the course are based on the National Geography Standards. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam to earn possible college credit.

  • AP American Government (2506/2507)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10 , 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Teacher or Divisional Recommendation.

    The AP United States Government course is designed to be comparable to a college introductory U.S. Government course. Students develop an analytical perspective on the federal, state, and local governments and politics, including a study of general concepts used to interpret government and politics, as well as the analysis of specific examples, i.e., the United States and Illinois Constitutions. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement American Government exam to earn possible college credit.

  • AP Macro Economics (2503/2504)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    The primary goal of this social studies course is to introduce students to the driving forces behind financial decision making at both the government and global level. Students will analyze graphs, calculate shifts and stressors, interpret global policy and financial movements and predict future outcomes based on current evidence. This class can be taken instead of the one-semester Global Economics class. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Macro Economics exam to earn possible college credit.

  • AP U.S. History (2508/2509)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11, 12

    The AP United States History course is designed to be comparable to a freshman level college survey course. Students will master a broad body of historical knowledge, analyze and interpret documents, and develop college level historical writing skills. This class can be taken instead of the US History class. Upon completion of this course, students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History exam to earn possible college credit.

  • AP World History (2501/2502)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: World History or AP Human Geography.

    Other Info: Due to the rigor of this class, it is not appropriate for freshmen. This course will count toward the World History graduation requirement or the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance - focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures - provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement U.S. History exam to earn possible college credit.

  • Sociology (2814)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This elective course introduces the student to skills needed to understand the behavior of people in-group situations. Through library research, community studies, interactive group projects, and a variety of instructional techniques, the student will become aware of the science of society and group living essential for the citizen of today.

  • Psychology (2815)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This course introduces the student to the study of human beings as complex individuals. Psychology as an academic discipline is studied, as well as ideas useful in dealing with problems in everyday life. The course of study will include the following topics: perception, the biological bases of behavior, personality theories, dream analysis, personality disturbances and therapy, applied psychology, heredity v. environment, and information techniques used by psychologists.

  • 20th Century Wars (2817)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This course will be a historical look at the major conflicts that have occurred during the Twentieth Century, beginning with World War I and concluding with the Gulf War. All aspects of wars will be studied: military, economic, social, political, etc. Special attention will be given to the causes of each war and the effects each war has had on the world. The primary goal of this course is to have the student understand how these conflicts have affected our lives today as well as how they affected the lives of those who lived through them.

  • Wars & Conflict (2821)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This course will be a look at the major wars around the world and how they have impacted history. This course starts with the Ancient Greeks and ends with the US Civil War. Al I aspects of war will be studied including military, economic, social, political, etc. The primary goals of this course are to have the students understand how these conflicts began and how they affected the nations and peoples involved. In addition, the impact of these wars on the lives of people today will be analyzed.

  • Civil War (2825)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Causes, events, and results of America’s most severe conflict, with emphasis on connections between slavery, sectionalism, racial democracy, and military-political events will be the focus of the class. The course will also include the character study of Abraham Lincoln, as well as how the war effected political, social and cultural change in America since 1865. Other topics will include: The Old South, leadership in the Civil War, major battles, life of a Civil War soldier, AfricanAmericans in the Civil War, local Civil War involvement (Carpentersville and the Dundees). Lincoln the literary giant, music and propaganda, Civil War literature, Reconstruction of the new south, the Ku Klux Klan, and Civil War cinematography. The class will also include: lecture, Socratic seminars, library research, Internet research, and oral presentations.

  • Youth & Law (2823)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 11, 12

    Prerequisite: American Government.

    Other Info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students are introduced to the American legal system as well as courtroom procedures and steps in a trial. Topics covered in this course include civil and criminal law, consumer law, and family law. Students learn how to participate in a mock trial and take turns as student attorneys, witnesses, and jurors.

  • ECC Humanities (ECC HUM 101)

    Length: May be taken in the fall or spring semester (Scheduled as a double period)

    Credit: 1.0 units per semester

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Middle College Program.

    Other Info: An application and interview are required prior to enrollment in the program for the following school year. Counts as Strand 2.

    A survey of selected examples of musical, artistic and literary contributions European culture has made to world civilization from pre-history to the Renaissance. This multidisciplined study is designed to assist students in the recognition and fundamental understanding of the continuity of elements of the European past with their own contemporary culture.

  • ECC Intro to Psychology (ECC PSY 100)

    Length: May be taken in the fall or spring semester (Scheduled as a double period)

    Credit: 1.0 units per semester

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Middle College Program.

    Other Info: An application and interview are required prior to enrollment in the program for the following school year. Counts as Strand 2.

    Introductory analysis of human behavior with emphasis on practical application of the basic principles of everyday situations. Areas covered include Introduction/Research, Methods/History of Psychology, Biology and Behavior, Learning, Memory, Motivation and Emotion, Personality Theory and Assessment, Psychological Disorders, Therapies, and Social Psychology.

  • ECC Principles of Sociology (ECC SOC 100)

    Length: May be taken in the fall or spring semester (Scheduled as a double period)

    Credit: 1.0 units per semester

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Middle College Program.

    Other Info: An application and interview are required prior to enrollment in the program for the following school year. Counts as Strand 2.

    A general introductory course designed to familiarize students with basic sociological concepts, theories and methods. The course is usually required for Social Science majors and a suggested elective or required course for non-majors.