English

    • In English, students will continue to build upon the foundation of reading and writing in Middle School with the emphasis on deepening a student’s understanding to be college and career ready. Students will encounter more rigorous texts while continuing to strengthen their comprehension and find connections across informational texts and literature. Students will write arguments focused on claims and relevant evidence, write informative texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, and write narratives depicting real experiences and events.

  • English 9 (1310/1311)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9

    Students will practice and apply skills necessary to reading high school materials and communicating complex ideas effectively in a variety of situations. They will apply analytic and critical reading skills to make and justify inferences about meaning in fiction and persuasive and expository texts, write focused multi-paragraph composition to persuade and explain, and compose and deliver effective speeches for a variety of purposes and audiences.

  • English 9 (1410/1411)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9

    Students will practice and apply skills necessary to reading challenging high school materials and communicating complex ideas effectively in a variety of situations. They will apply analytic and critical reading skills to make and justify inferences about meaning in fiction and persuasive and expository texts, write focused multi-paragraph composition to persuade and explain, and compose and deliver effective speeches for a variety of purposes and audiences. Students will demonstrate independent thinking skills and will adhere to the demanding structure of this course. This course is designed to prepare students for the challenges of AP courses in the sophomore, junior, or senior year.

  • English 10 (1313/1314)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10

    Prerequisite: English 9, summer school, night school, or concurrent enrollment.

    Tenth grade students will continue to explore necessary skills in reading and writing, while reinforcing skills in English 9. Students will study world literature and use knowledge of cultural context. They will apply themes and allusions to make connections between different cultures and literatures. Students will continue to expand on writing and vocabulary acquisition.

  • English 10 (1413/1414)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10

    Prerequisite: English 9, summer school, night school, or concurrent enrollment.

    Students will continue to explore complex skills in reading and writing, while reinforcing skills in English 9. Students will study world literature and use knowledge of cultural context. They will analyze and evaluate themes and allusions to make connections between different cultures and literatures. Students will be challenged to write in-depth essays and arguments, utilizing vocabulary knowledge. Reading and writing instruction and assignments will be designed to prepare students for the challenges of AP courses in the junior and senior years. Students will demonstrate independent thinking skills and will adhere to

  • English 11 (1316/1317)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11

    Prerequisite: English 9 and 10, summer school, night school, or concurrent enrollment.

    This course is devoted to a thematic study of American literature. Students will continue to build on skills for reading and writing. Students will write and analyze a variety of literary and rhetorical devices. In addition, students will study grammar, usage, and vocabulary as a means of improving writing skills for college and career readiness.

  • English 11 (1416/1417)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11

    Prerequisite: English 9 and 10, summer school, night school, or concurrent enrollment.

    This course is devoted to a thematic study of American literature. Students will continue to refine skills for reading and writing. Students will write and analyze a variety of literary and rhetorical devices. Students will demonstrate understanding through extensive writing in and out of class. In addition, students will study grammar, usage, and vocabulary as a means of improving writing skills for college and career readiness. Students will demonstrate independent thinking skills and will adhere to

  • Senior Expository Experience (1323)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    This course will focus on the Senior Expository Experience in which students will select a topic of interest, engage in research about that topic, write a research paper making an argument about the topic, and present their findings to peers and faculty members. Topics will revolve around argumentation, modes of rhetoric, rhetorical analysis, and research methodology.

  • Senior Expository Experience (1423)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    This course will focus on the Senior Expository Experience in which students will select a topic of interest, engage in research about that topic, write a research paper making an argument about the topic, and present their findings to peers and faculty members. Topics will revolve around argumentation, modes of rhetoric, rhetorical analysis, and research methodology.

  • Survey of Gothic Literature (1360)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    No matter who you are or where you live, we all share one common emotion: fear. This course will lead us directly into this fear and how it shapes who we are and the society around us. Why do we fear ourselves? How does the supernatural play with our emotions? Why are we so fascinated by these questions? Finally, how can asking these questions help us to find and develop a deeper purpose within ourselves?

  • Survey of Shakespearean Literature (1361)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    Should we still be reading Shakespeare? Yes, yes we should. Most well-read people claim Shakespeare is the most important and influential writer in the English language. And as a result, most students are dragged kicking and screaming through his inscrutable play-texts and poetry. These scholars believe we should be reading him, but why?

    This course will attempt to address the questions of why Shakespeare looms large over Western civilization. We will talk about gender, race, and religion. We will talk about love, murder, betrayal, and witchcraft. We will talk about the heartbreakingly beautiful and the wildly inappropriate. We will talk about his stolen plot structures, how he was influenced by the ancient world, how he attempted to influence the Kings and Queens who actually attended his plays.

    More than anything, we will talk about how he, like most great artists, takes an understood mode of producing art and changes it – expanding within the apparent confines – the very substance of that form. Like Ray Charles, Miles Davis, Elvis Presley, Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Beatles, The Ramones, The Beach Boys, Biggie Smalls, The Roots, Kanye West, and various others, Shakespeare uses sound and form in ways both familiar and groundbreaking.

  • Survey of Women’s Literature (1362)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    In ancient times and in modern times, in nations great and small, the roles of women in society have been the subject of private and public debate. Should a woman marry or live independently? Should she have a career or should she raise children? Should she choose her own path or have it chosen for her by men? The debate, it seems, is never settled. A wide variety of women from many regions, from as early as 1400 BC and into the 21st century, are the subjects of the texts in this unit. The selections explore the question of what it means to be a woman in marriage, as a member of society, as an artist, and as a leader of others, across time and culture.

  • Survey of Multi-Cultural Literature (1363)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    In this course, explore cultures of the world and their impact on American culture. Students will read, write, and present on various cultures through novels, short stories, poetry, and other multimedia sources not commonly found in mainstream literature from European to Middle Eastern and Asian to American cultures. Students will engage in collaborative discussions, projects, and writing to make sense of issues people of the world face.

  • Senior English Composition (1324)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    Students explore a vast array of literature through the study of three literary movements from the past two centuries through several genres, including poetry, short stories, novel excerpts, speeches, and a national anthem. Students will consider how literary movements are expressed in different genres and by a variety of authors.

    Students will also explore the English Renaissance and Elizabethan period through poetry, drama, and satire. Following the Middle Ages, the Renaissance (which means “rebirth” in French) marked a transition from the ancient to the modern world. Renaissance writers focused on secular concerns—the affairs of this world, including love,

  • Senior English Composition (1424)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    Students explore a vast array of literature through the study of three literary movements from the past two centuries through several genres, including poetry, short stories, novel excerpts, speeches, and a national anthem. Students will consider how literary movements are expressed in different genres and by a variety of authors.

    Students will also explore the English Renaissance and Elizabethan period through poetry, drama, and satire. Following the Middle Ages, the Renaissance (which means “rebirth” in French) marked a transition from the ancient to the modern world. Renaissance writers focused on secular concerns—the affairs of this world, including love, politics, science, and philosophy.



  • AP English Language and Composition (1516/1517)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 11, 12

    Prerequisite: English 10 & Teacher or Divisional Recommendation.

    Other info: This course may be taken instead of English 11 or English 12, and counts toward the English graduation requirement.

    The AP English Language and Composition course asks students to engage in analysis of the world around them. Everything from advertisements to literary works to the spaces in which we live becomes a text in our exploration of argument, rhetoric, and style. Through close reading of these texts, students can improve their analytical and critical thinking skills. Students will also engage in the creation of several well-developed writing assignments that will both introduce them to the rigors of college level writing and aid them in honing their own style, voice, and ability to communicate with the written word.

  • AP English Literature and Composition (1519/1520)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: English 11 or AP English Language & Teacher or Divisional Recommendation.

    Other info: This course may be taken instead of English 12, and counts toward the English graduation requirement.

    The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students can deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students should consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.

  • AP Capstone: Seminar (1531/1532)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11

    Prerequisite: Teacher or Divisional Recommendation.

    The AP Capstone Program is a 2 year sequence of courses that is designed to equip students “with the skills to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence based arguments.” AP Seminar is the first year course and AP Research is the second year course. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research will receive the AP Seminar and Research Certificate signifying their attainment of college-level academic and research skills. Students who earn scores of 3 or higher in AP Seminar and AP Research and on four additional AP Exams of their choosing will receive the AP Capstone Diploma. This signifies their outstanding academic achievement and attainment of college-level academic and research skills.

    Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

  • ECC English Composition 1 (ECC ENG 101)

    Length: May be taken in the fall or spring semester

    Credit: 1.0 units per semester (Scheduled as a double period)

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Middle College Program.

    Other info: An application and interview are required prior to enrollment in the program for the following school year. This class may be taken instead of English 12 and will count toward the graduation requirement for English. May also be taken as a Strand 2 course.

    This course is the first semester of one year course normally required by all universities and colleges. Emphasis on improvement of communication through intensive work in composition, reading and skills of discussion. Major objective of course is to develop proficiency in writing thoughtful, well organized, effective essays. Various forms of prose are studied to help the student achieve a critical understanding of both form and content and to serve as the basis of student essays.

  • ECC English Composition 2 (ECC ENG 102)

    Length: May be taken in the fall or spring semester

    Credit: 1.0 units per semester (scheduled as a double period)

    Grade: 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Middle College Program and grade of C or better in ECC English Composition 1.

    Other info: An application and interview are required prior to enrollment in the program for the following school year. This class may be taken ·instead of English 12 and will count toward the graduation requirement for English. May also be taken as a Strand 2 course.

    Second semester of one-year course normally required by all universities and colleges. Emphasis on achieving logic and precision in handling such extensive compositions as the research paper and persuasive and critical themes based on literature or other academic disciplines.

  • Reading and Thinking Skills (1800/1801)

    Length: Based on teacher recommendation, this course can be taken as 1 semester or 2 semesters

    Credit: 1 semester:0.5 units or 2 semesters:1.0 unit

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Teacher or divisional recommendation.

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Freshmen that are enrolled in this course will defer enrollment in Biology until sophomore year. Reading Skills is a course for students needing additional assistance in reading instruction.

  • Journalism I (1820)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Journalism is a one-semester elective for students interested in learning the journalistic styles of writing, including news, features, sports, entertainment, opinions and editorials. Classroom instruction focuses on developing the basic journalism skills of interviewing, reporting and writing. Students apply the techniques learned in this class to the production of the high school newspaper.

  • Journalism II (1821/1822)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Journalism I.

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students in this class apply the techniques in Journalism 1 to stories they write for the school’s student newspaper. Students also have opportunities to serve in various editorial positions and are involved in newspaper production, layout, page design and photography.

  • Creative Writing I (1828)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students learn to write effectively using various writing strategies. Class assignments and exercises include but are not limited to poetry, fiction, narratives and non-fiction. Students share their works for classroom critiquing and peer editing.

  • Creative Writing II (1829)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Creative Writing I.

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This is an intensive writing course in which students will continue to write effectively using various writing strategies. Class assignments and exercises include but are not limited to poetry, fiction, narratives and non-fiction. Students share their works for classroom critiquing and peer editing.

  • Debate (1830)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    This class correlates the basic strands of language arts involving reading, writing, critical thinking, and speaking. The emphasis is on preparing and familiarizing students with debating techniques. Students will learn the Lincoln-Douglas style, policy style and the Congressional formats. Students will not be required to take this knowledge further and participate in extra-curricular competition. Students will research, write, and practice different debate formats with the emphasis on persuasion and the art of being able to think on their feet.

  • College 101 for Juniors (1832)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 11

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students planning to attend college and reading at grade level develop criteria on which to base a realistic college search while learning tactics to help them navigate the maze of college brochures, catalogs, and websites and the steps of the application process. Students explore career paths and research admission requirements and academic offerings at various colleges. Students also focus on the study techniques and thinking skills necessary for college-level learning, including reading, notetaking, using graphic organizers, writing, and test-taking techniques. Time and stress management techniques are also addressed.

  • College 101 for Seniors (1833)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students planning to attend college and reading at grade level develop criteria on which to base a realistic college search while learning tactics to help them navigate the maze of college brochures, catalogs, and websites and the steps of the application process. Students explore career paths and research admission requirements and academic offerings at various colleges. Students also focus on the study techniques and thinking skills necessary for college-level learning, including reading, note taking, using graphic organizers, writing, and test-taking techniques. Time and stress management techniques are also addressed.

  • Yearbook Publication (1837/1838)

    Length: 2 semesters

    Credit: 1.0 unit

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students learn how to use current publishing technology such as lnDesign, Photoshop, the Internet, and Microsoft Word. Students learn the terminology and skills specific to yearbook publication, including arranging and taking photographs, advertising, cropping, writing and editing copy, and designing layouts. Each student is responsible for completing several individual projects in which he or she showcases all skills learned in the class. Interested students may further develop knowledge and participate on the yearbook staff.

  • Public Speaking (1839)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    In this performance-based class, students prepare, rehearse, present, and participate in a variety of speaking and listening activities. This elective supports the Common Core Standards of speaking/listening: the communication process, informal speaking, formal speaking, group communication, and special communication situations. Activities may include, but are not limited to, an informative, demonstrative, and/or persuasive speech; an interpretation of prose or verse; impromptu speeches; interviewing skills, commercials; active listening; research and outlining; interpersonal communication; group discussion; and problem solving. Interested students may further develop knowledge by participating in extra-curricular competition.

  • Film Criticism I (1852)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Challenge critics with the knowledge you will gain in this film study course. Film Criticism enables you to enjoy the movies and recognize innovative techniques that have made some of the good movies into classics.

  • Film Criticism II (1853)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 10, 11, 12

    Film Criticism II offers students a more in-depth look into the unique ways stories are told through film while gaining an appreciation of the medium itself. Students will continue to learn how to “read” films while gaining practice in film analysis and refine their awareness of how each element - where the story is set, how the action is ordered, how characters are introduced and developed, sound or lack thereof, cinematography, acting/casting, technological advancements, etc. - contributes to the sense of reality created by film.

  • Language Skills for Geometry (1890/1891)

    Length: Course can be taken as 1 semester or 2 semesters

    Credit: 1 semester:0.5 units or 2 semesters:1.0 unit

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in an ESL Ill or IV Language & Literacy course. Limited English Proficient identified and placement based on ACCESS test results (3.0 -4.9), 2-4 active years in EL programing and ESL teacher or Divisional recommendation.

    Other info: This course is taken in addition to Geometry. This course will support Els in Geometry by incorporating language and skill building strategies.

    The language instructional focus is to build background knowledge, front load content specific vocabulary, and support content comprehensible input. The skill instructional focus is to support various content-based skills and concepts taught in a geometry course. The course supports language, content, and skill development.

  • Theatre Workshop (1850)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Other info: This course explores the elements of drama through improvisation, theatre games, and scenes from contemporary plays.

    Students will develop skills in acting, play making and scene analysis, as well as understanding the full process of creating theatre. Theatre workshop is the first of a two semester introduction to theatre; students should plan to take Acting after completing Theatre Workshop.

  • Acting (1851)

    Length: 1 semester

    Credit: 0.5 units

    Grade: 9, 10, 11, 12

    Prerequisite: Theatre Workshop.

    Other info: This course will count toward the Strand 2 graduation requirement.

    Students will learn the basic skills and techniques of the actor including: concentration, imagination, observation, and ensemble. Through the means of theatre games, improvisation, creative writing, and written analyses, students learn the fundamentals of creating character, writing monologues, performing monologues, and preparing a scene for performance.